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Tag "twitter"

The news papers are currently not only fueling the data mining trend, they are pushing it themselves. The New York Times is leading the way with the data viz lab, but also the Guardian with the data blog is very active. Now the Wall Street Journal is picking up on the topic and has just published a number of stories on Foursquare data analysis.

Just like the NYT or the Guardian, the people at the Wall Street Journal are not just writing about it they are collecting and processing the data themselves. It’s almost like the return of the good old journalist days, where stories are entirely produced by news papers, just that it is digital, remote and massive this time.

A Week on Foursquare WSJ
Image taken from l2thinktank / The heat map showing Foursquare check-in activity in New York between 9am and 11am on a Monday.

The WSJ projet ‘A Week on Foursquare‘ collected every single check in on Foursquare for an entire week, earlier this year. They recorded “Over 10.9 million check-ins — that’s more than 1.5 million a day” which includes check-ins world wide. For New York alone there are 310,000+ check-ins and for San Francisco and the Bay Area 190,000+.

Comparing these numbers to the NCL Twitter data set that we collect for urban areas, this Foursquare data set seems to be quite good. With a low level access to Twitter we recorded about half the number of location based tweets that WSJ did on Foursquare. For the New York NCL map we collected 160’000+ location based tweets and 80’000+ for San Francisco NCL. However, there are a ot more tweets out there that potentially coud be draw in to a dataset. WSJ claims to have collected every single Foursquare check in, where with Twitter we are collecting about 1% of tweets. So there is some potential in terms of numbers. This is however not to say , that the quality of the information would be better. It might, but who knows.

A Week on Foursquare WSJ
Image taken from markwilliammann / A graph showing the popularity of the top 80 locations along percentage of check-ins. Blue and red show New York and San Francisco respectively. The list is clearly lead by the check-in at the office followed by home and coffee shop.

The people at WSJ have run all sorts of visualisation on the data, mainly focusing on the vis of distribution and rankings. With the check-in function Foursquare offers, the venues are a very obvious element to look at. They concluded “the distribution of venues world-wide showed that out of the 2,197,870 venues with a category assigned, and at least one check-in during the week, 44.5% had just one check-in. Just 2,500 venues had 100 or more check-ins. The most popular had more than 13,000 over the week, and the second most had almost 7,000. Venue popularity dropped off very quickly, but had an extremely long tail. The average number of check-ins per venues was 4, and the median was 2.”

This one extremely popular venue in fact was not an actual place, but a fictional place in New York with the name Snowpocalypse 2011 and was related to the snowfall New York saw during the week the data was collected. Some 13’000 people checked in over the period of of two days. See the weather related details HERE.

On the man page you can replay the data on a map for the locations New York and San Francisco. The visualisation is based on heat maps overlaid on Google Maps. Interesting is the offering of three views, each showing the same location but with a one hour time shift. Using this its interesting to follow a build up of activity or at the end of the day the rather quick brake of in activity.

San Francisco New City Landscape

Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / San Francisco New City Landscape – Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view. The maps were created using our CASA Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded by Steven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity.

Comparing the WSJ Foursquare heat maps to the NCL density maps that we produced using the Twitter data there are a lot of similarities. In fact mostly the maps overall pick up the same hot spots. Most notable is the difference in New York, where Brooklyn is almost not active on Foursquare, where on Twitter, Brooklyn is as active as Manhattan. Also the Financial District is on Foursquare is not quite as active and trails behind Soho. In San Francisco the overal pattern is again similar with the main activity area concentrated around the Market Street. However, interestingly there is quite some activities around the Golden Gate Park especially after work between 5pm and 9pm.

These data sets will increasingly play an important role in spatial analysis, simply because they seemingly deliver the facts to activities and places. However, looking at the stats of both Twitter and Foursquare it shows how little of the population is represented in these data sets. WSJ makes it quite clear in their blog post that “a survey last year showed that fewer than 5% of Americans had ever used Foursquare or its rivals, and only about 1% used such a location-based service on a daily basis.” As such, beside the visualisation there is currently little that can be finally concluded on a general level. Nevertheless, there is a quite a lot o potential for projects looking at the sample as such, inventing a constrained context. There are enough details that can be investigated limited to the sample.

New York New City Landscape

Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / New York New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view.

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Geneva is the Swiss city with the most important international connections. In Geneva a lot of international organisations have a headquarter such as UNO, WHO, UNHCR, ILO, WIPO and the Red Cross. But there are also other institution of international significance based, such a the CERN or the World Wide Web Library.

This results in a very dense network of international connections and puts a rather small city on the world map. Geneva only has a population of some 190’000 people. This makes it the second largest city in Switzerland after Zuerich and before Basel and Bern.

Geneva New City Landscape
Image by urbanTick for NCL / Geneva New City Landscape map generated from location based tweets collected over the period of one week. The area covered is within a 30 km radius of Geneva.

Geneva is just like Basel another Swiss city located right at the border. Here it is the crossing between Switzerland and France. The map with a 30km radius then covers large areas of France too. It reaches right down to the French town of Annecy in the south.

The international flair in Geneva together with the beautiful scenery around the Lake of Geneva (Lac Leman) and the proximity to the mountains with great ski resorts also attracts high profile celebrities, who either live there or have a second home. For example Yoko Ono, Shania Twain or Phil Collins all live around the Lake Geneva. Also interesting there is a very special group of celebrities living in the area Michael Schumacher, Jacques Villeneuve, Jean Alesi, Alain Prost, David Coulthard and Fernando Alonso I wonder if they all go together for a spin around Lake Geneva once a week.

Geneva New City Landscape

Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Geneva New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view. The maps were created using our CASA Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded by Steven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity.

The very peak of the Geneva NCL is just above the Jet d’Eau the major Geneva landmark. It is located in the port out on a jetty shooting 500 litre of water per second 140 meter into the sky. It has been the symbol for the past 130 years.

In the main hill most of the international organisations are included. There are a number of tweets from UNO, WHO and so on just to the North East of the Jet d’Eau. The second peak next to the central one is around the international airport and the PalExpo in the area of Vernier. An then there is a sort of activity ridge along the north shore of the Lake Geneva, the locations most of the international celebrities live.

Geneva timeRose
Image by urbanTick for NCL / The rose shows the twitter activity per hour of the day, starting at 00:00 at the top, displayed in local time. Geneva is a night time city with more activity between midnight and four than through out the work day. The graphs show the platform of preference used to send the tweet and the language set respectively.

Interestingly the data for Geneva shows a completely different time activity pattern than any of the urban areas looked at before. So far the activity over 24 hours always more or less fitted with the normal day activity pattern and showed the characteristic activity low between the early morning hours 3am – 4am. However Geneva has its activity peaks between 1am and 3am and overall the general activity high is between midnight and 6am.

Regarding the language English and Japanese are leading the table before French. Maybe this could explain the out of hour activity. Users are tweeting with and to different parts of the world during odd times, because of the different local times.

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Milan based Mousse magazine is running a series with the title ‘Ten Fundamental Questions of Curating‘. The editor of the series, Jens Hoffmann explains: “it emerged from a desire to trace the coordinates of contemporary curatorial practice, to take stock of a profession that is constantly evolving. Through the contributions of ten curators, the ten essays in the project examine ten fundamental themes in curating. The booklets are structured as hypothetical chapters in a book that once completed, through the reflections of some of the leading figures in the contemporary scene, will try to offer an answer to the question of “what it means to be a curator today”

I was invited by the London based artist Marysia Lewandowska to collaborate on her contribution to the fourth edition.

Mousse 4/10 Why Mediate Art?
Image taken from Mousse / Page one of ‘4/10 Why Mediate Art?’.

The fourth instalment of “Ten Fundamental Questions of Curating” looks for an answer to the question “Why Mediate Art?”. The editor Jens Hoffmann invited Maria Lind to contribute who in turn proposed to work with Marysia Lewandowska as an artist curator collaboration. In her text Maria Lind examines the seeming paradoxes that revolve around art institutions: an overabundance of traditional educational activities, aimed at engaging an ever broader public; marketing departments and press offices that take on a strategic role; curators who have no real interest in making their project known outside the professional sphere. The Swedish curator explains the importance of weaving connections between works, curatorial projects and the public, for a new kind of artistic “mediation”. Marysia Lewandowska proposal extends the meaning of mediation in our networked culture by connecting the ‘followers’ of major contemporary art museum and public galleries and Maria Lind’s text through twitter.

Mousse 4/10 Why Mediate Art?
Image taken from Mousse / Page one of ‘4/10 Why Mediate Art?’. Click Image for the interactive version.

This is the time when art is mediated to its audience not only through lectures, seminars, artists’ talks, guided tours and publications but when mediation intervenes as a pulsating stream of immediacy, mixing the promotional intentions of the institution with the visitors’ desires of sharing their observations and responses. The banal is closely entangled with the political, the randomness is attached to a system as announced by the ubiquitous banner: Twitter is a rich source of instantly updated information. It’s easy to stay updated on an incredibly wide variety of topics. By utilising the social networking platforms such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter that emerged over the past few years, the communication between the art institutions and their audiences has grown into a real time stream of information snippets.

Interactive version created by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Twitter Education. Tweets collected using 140kit, to visualise the network Gephi was used. Click HERE for the full screen version.

What appears on the visuals are graphs mapping tweets sent by three major art institutions, Tate in London, MOMA in New York and Moderna Museet in Stockholm to communicate and mediate their activities as they are enmeshed together with Maria Lind’s text. The two text streams have been aggregated as a word chain, where each word is connected with a link to the following word in the sentence. Each word is represented only once as a node in the chain, but in many cases with multiple connections, edges, to the following words. The resulting visualisation is of a network based on the structure of the words in use. The two different sources are distinguished where red lines represent the links between the words in the tweets sent by the art institutions, while the black lines show the flow of the essay written by Maria Lind. The tweets cover the period between 2009-09-16,15:18 and 2010-11-29 16:03.

Mousse 4/10 Why Mediate Art?
Image taken from Mousse / Page one of ‘4/10 Why Mediate Art?’. Tweets collected using 140kit, to visualise the network Gephi was used. Click Image for the interactive version.

For artist Marysia Lewandowska the mapping of this flow expresses a desire and interest in distributive networks without restriction; it is the desire of being in touch and engaged, of organising one’s thoughts and sharing them instantly. The knowledge ecologies of a wider world intersect in unexpected ways and point to the role mediation plays in shaping our current social and political life.

Publication – Mousse, Editor – Jens Hoffmann, Text – Maria Lind, Art – Marysia Lewandowska, published 2011.

Ten Fundamental Questions of Curating, edited by Jens Hoffmann and published by Mousse in collaboration with the Fiorucci Art Trust, is distributed with the international edition of Mousse and with subscription copies.

Interactive version created by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Twitter Education. Tweets collected using 140kit, to visualise the network Gephi was used. Click HERE for the full screen version.

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Not quite sure which app to use to read and write your tweets? Well it is tricky and there are loads of options out there. Actually it has become a whole Twitter Ecosystem with apps growing into from everywhere, all aiming for the best place under the twitter sun.

Brian Solis and JESS3 created a visual depiction of the, what they call, Twitterverse (as in universe actually). The graphics shows loads of twitter apps neatly ordered and lined up on concentric rings of types. These range form Geographics like trendsmap to rich media like yFrog, to mobile apps like echofone, to twitter search like twazzup.

Each group has its speciality and a niche. This works quite nicely for users. However there is also some overlap between some and this is where it rumbles in the ecosystem.

Check out the interactive map, you can click on the names for in-depth info about each service. Feel free to order the poster-sized infographic to hang in your office and teach others about Twitter, or download the image map for your blog. Via Flowtown.

Twitterverse
Map by Brian Solis and JESS3 / A visual depiction of the Twitter ecosystem, the Twitterverse, to help you learn more about all the tools available. Click the image for the interactive version.

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Getting the tweets out on time, actually at the right time, is very easy since the invention of Timely the on time tweet tool discussed earlier in ‘Social Networking on Time‘. Now the tool has been refreshed.

Timely allows to schedule a whole list of twitter messages and sends them out at the best time optimizing reader outreach. Based on the past 200 tweets a timeframe for best outreach is calculated and following tweets are sent out at exactly the best time.

The tool developed by the flowtown team just got better, with a major update released today. ‘Timely Gets An Activity Stream‘ with stats that are actually transparent and reliable. It is still the basic number, but there is now a drop down menue showing the actual retweets. Each tweet is listed chronologically just like in the Twitter stream. This streamlines the task of finding out who retweeted and in which context. No need to run a search through Twitter, Timely delivers it straight to the dashboard.

timelyUpdate02
Image by urbanTick taken from Timely / urbanTick on Timely with the update listing function of retweets.

Further, it is possible to take it a step further and replay directly to each retweet. It offers basic function of an @tweet. This means thanks and ad-dons can be sent from the same platform. With this the information delivery and management goes in one and the from the ground up rebuilt Performance service gives every ambitious promoter peace of mind out of the box.

As Jason Keath from socialFresh points out: Timely has been open to the public since February, and already needs to expand the capability of their service to account for increased use. The service currently has over 15,000 total accounts and continues to grow.

timelyUpdate01
Image by urbanTick taken from Timely / Timely now allows to directly replay to Twitter users who retweeted timed tweets served through Timely.

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Seoul is the capital and largest city of South Korea. A megacity with a population of over 10 million, it is one of the largest cities in the world. Seoul proper is noted for its population density, which is almost twice as concentrated as New York and eight times greater than Rome, though slightly less than that of Paris. The use of technology in everyday live is very integrated, even more so than in western cities that only are discovering the connectedness. In this sense the number of tweets being sent from Seoul is very high, with a high percentage of location based tweets.

The Seoul New City Landscape (NCL) map is generated purely from geolocated tweets, sent over the period of one week using the devices GPS information. This is virtual landscape generated from tweet density sent from within a 30 km radius of the Seoul region. NCL is an ongoing project and we have covered cities worldwide. An overview can be found HERE.

Seoul New City Landscape
Image by urbanTick for NCL / Seoul New City Landscape map generated from location based tweets collected over the period of one week. The area covered is within a 30 km radius of Seoul.

In terms of the morphology, the Seoul NCL is a type with more than one centre. There are two main centres with additional smaller centres of high activity. Even though it is not visible, the river dividing the two main centres can be imagined from the landscape. The smaller centres dotted around belong to ‘new towns’ built around 1980 with predominately residential usage.

The main area to the West is the ‘old centre’ of Seoul with the formal institutions, the palace and the main tourist destinations. There is also business, mainly baking and shopping. The main area to the East is the ‘new centre’ with a sort of London Soho touch. This includes again shopping and business.

Regarding the airport, wich is usually a very active spot on the NCL maps, in Soul the International airport is outside the covered area, but the old Seoul airport for domestic flights is on there to the West of the centre. However, it is not very active and only shows as a small hill.

Seoul New City Landscape

Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Seoul New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view. The maps were created using our CASA Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded by Steven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity. Thanks for the help with the labeling to Sung-Hyun Jang from AR+GIS.

The temporal usage of twitter in Seoul is indeed different from the European and American cities. There is on the week day rose a clear preference for mid week activity. The weekend is not very active also Monday is very slow. On the 24 hours scale Seoul shows the typical dip in the early morning hours around 3-4 o’clock, but other than that it does not relate to the kidney shape of western cities. It has some four peaks, one in the morning one over midday, one in the evening and one around midnight. It look as if people in Seoul would tweet more or less four times a day. Overall it is one of the cities more active in the second part of the day with a very late night.

Seoul_timeRoses-06
Image by urbanTick for NCL / The lefthand rose shows the twitter activity over the days of the week, starting with Sunday at the top, going clockwise. The rose on the right shows the tweet activity per hour of the day, starting at 00:00 at the top. Here we are showing local time in Seoul. Hence the characteristic dip between three and five o’clock in the morning. Seoul is a typical evening city with more activity n the late hours of the day. For more details on the time comparision with other NCL urban areas please see the presentation post ‘Twitter Data – Seeking Spatial Patter’

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Following the SFO aNCL, an update to the earlier San Francisco map was needed. The slight redesign of the map islands with changed key and added graphs of temporal elements. The exclusive islandification of the area is enforce with a new frame. This provides more visual stability, allowing for stronger vertical orientation.

San Francisco New City Landscape

Regarding the temporal elements, San Francisco is an evening city. The lefthand rose shows the twitter activity over the days of the week, starting with Sunday at the top, going clockwise. The rose on the right shows the tweet activity per hour of the day, starting at 00:00 at the top. Here we are showing local time in San Francisco. Hence the characteristic dip between three and five o’clock in the morning. San Francisco is a typical evening city with more activity in the late hours of the day. There is a lot more activity in the later hours of the day than there is in the mornings. Comparing to Bogotá for example, a morning city, SFO has this lag with a first peak around noon and then high activity between 20h00 and 23h00. After that it drops off quite quickly, being considerably lower around midnight reaching the base around 3 am.

sanFrancisco_timeRose

San Francisco New City Landscape

Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / San Francisco New City Landscape – Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view. The maps were created using our CASA Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded by Steven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity.

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San Francisco is busy tweeting and this new animation of location based tweets in the Bay Area show actually how busy it is. Geo located tweets are shown as yellow circles that fade away by time, and re-tweets are shown as small yellow points moving onto a line connecting the location of the original tweet and the geo location of the re-tweeter.

The data used is the same as for the San Francisco New City Landscape (NCL) map. Where a virtual landscape was generated from the tweets. More details HERE. This new animated version shows in detail how the different centres ebb and flow as time passes. There are distinct characteristics between the location over times of the day. Basically the Bay bridge keeps it all together.

Interestingly the RT’s are a very specific day thing. During the night this information channel is not ver active and people seem to be busy tweeting their own stuff. In a sense this could be hinting at a more formal and business use of the RT function.

This animation is developed in collaboratively Anders Johansson and urbanTick. The data was collected using our CASA Tweet-O-Meter tool, coded by Steven Gray, in association with DigitalUrban.

There is more to come. We will be working our way through the NCL data collection of over 70 cities from around the world. Within the next week will be posting the next city to continue this aNCL (animated New City Landscape) series.

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THe MTV Music Awards are one of the really big yearly music shows and as such a important date in the calendar. Of course this transfers to the social networking sites, with loads of followers chatting about it online.

For last years show Stamen has teamed up with MTV and Twitter to deliver a live visualisation of the conversations on twitter about the stars related to the show. The whole thing was based on word tags, counts to indicated how often each star was mentioned. These numbers feed into the visualisation showing an icon for each performer in the relative size of its online counter.

Twitter Visualisation MTV Music Awards
Image taken from fastcompany / screen shot of the live visualisation created by Stamen for the MTV Music Awards 2010.

This generates this bubble size chart layout, with the higher rated names moving into the centre. There is obviously some direct action going on between the fn camps of the individual stars and the online conversations reflect pretty much in real time the activity on screen. People are tweeting as they watch, mainly in front of the tv, presumably. As Stamen points out:”Midway through the video, Taylor Swift gets up on stage to receive her first Video Music Award—to have it promptly snatched from her grasp by Kanye West, who immediately blows up on Twitter.”

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The Columbian capital is quite an active spot with tweeters. In general the twitter platform is very popular in South America and Bogota is no exemption. However it is in terms of overall numbers behind fanatic tweeters such as Sao Paulo and Rio, but in Bogota we still have quite a good number of location based tweets. There are about 18% of the tweets geolocated providing a good base for the Bogota New City Landscape Map (NCL).

The NCL map is generated as a virtual landscape from geolocated tweets sent from within a 30 km radius of the Bogota area over the period of one week. NCL is an ongoing project and we have covered earlier that can be found through HERE.

The striking thing is the extreme cluster tendency in this version of the map. The twitter activity is simply and only concentrated in the business area of the capital along Carrera 7. No wonder this is where things are happening with a lineup of business, shopping and nightlife, where else would you go. This must also be where the money is, since the sample does require the users to use one of the more recent mobile gadgets. Hence the large void to the south and west, where lesser people are using the service. The third large void is defined by the large mountain ridge Cerros Orientales. The landscape feature her as a cut, both on the virtual scape and in the real world.

Bogota_export-040rgb
Image by urbanTick for NCL / Bogotá New City Landscape map generated from location based tweets collected over the period of one week. The area covered is within a 30 km radius of Bogotá.

In terms of the morphology, even though Bogota NCL features a singular hotspot like the lot of London, Paris, Barcelona it fits more with the feature structure of New York or San Francisco. Especially in term sof how it relate to the physical structure of the city fitting in along this mountain ridge, witch is sort of 1 to 1 reflected in the virtual twitter landscape.

The detailed overview of NCL cities from around the world can be found on the NCL World View, with links to the individual interactive versions.

Bogotá New City Landscape

Image by urbanTick using the GMap Image Cutter / Bogotá New City Landscape -Use the Google Maps style zoom function in the top right corner to zoom into the map and explore it in detail. Explore areas you know close up and find new locations you have never heard of. Click HERE for a full screen view. The maps were created using our CASA Tweet-O-Meter, in association with DigitalUrban and coded by Steven Gray, this New City Landscape represents location based twitter activity. Thanks for the help with the labeling to Luis Suarez from EstudioArQ.

Bogota_timeRoses-06
Image by urbanTick for NCL / The lefthand rose shows the twitter activity over the days of the week, starting with Sunday at the top, going clockwise. The rose on the right shows the tweet activity per hour of the day, starting at 00:00 at the top. Here we are showing local time in Bogota. Hence the characteristic dip between three and five o’clock in the morning. Bogota is a typical morning city with more activity n the morning hours of the day. For more details on the time comparision with other NCL urban areas please see the presentation post ‘Twitter Data – Seeking Spatial Patter’

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